Menstrual Products That Are Good For You (And The Environment) | OPINION

Blood comes out of my vagina every month and has been since I was really young. That means I have used a lot of pads and tampons. All of which has cost me money and cost my planet. Below are a few period products I have come to love, including a few BONUS Yoga-inspired moves (from my favourite YouTubers) that really help for those uncomfortable and painful periods or PMS days.

I love these products because they help me save money, they have a gentler impact on the planet and they all believe in the common cause to uplift and support women and humans with vaginas!

Bamboo Pads

Pads are one of the first menstrual products introduced to humans with vaginas. They’re really easy to use; with an adhesive strip on the back that sticks to the underwear. Most are made of cotton and some have added fragrances or layering. I used pads for most of my menstrual journey. However, the one thing that really put me off wearing pads was the harmful chemicals they leached out into the earth, air and (potentially) oceans after ending up in landfills. According to the OrganiCup blog, conventional pads contain chemicals such as chlorine, rayon and dioxin. I checked out three different brands of pads in my home, the Always and Stayfree brands didn’t have anything resembling an ‘ingredients list’, but the Libresse pack did. Although it didn’t mention the three chemicals listed above, it contained polypropylene and polyethylene. According to the Reliance Foundry blog, polyethylene is great to be recycled, but not suitable to be disposed of in a landfill. Tbh I wouldn’t want the same chemical that is used to make literally every other plastic product near my most sensitive body parts…

The closest answer to my dilemma was the Here We Flo Bamboo Pads. They’re incredibly soft, fragrance-free, cruelty-free, vegan and 99% biodegradable! Plus it’s plastic-free, does not contain dioxins, artificial dyes or chlorine – these pads tick all the right boxes. The pads come in two ‘sizes’: a Day-pad for regular flows and a Night-pad for heavier flow days. I purchased the ‘Combo Pack’ which contains 10 Day and 5 Night pads, so you can easily play around with the absorbency.

Here We Flo Bamboo Pads | Credit: Ethical Superstore

I bought these from my local Clicks store, but you can buy directly from their website (or schedule monthly deliveries to your door!) And if you thought this woman-owned company couldn’t get any cooler, they donate 5% of their profits towards organisations fighting against Female Genital Cutting (FGC) and who aim to provide menstrual products to humans who are unable to afford them (because pink tax is real).

If you’re used to thick chonky pads, these may feel like thin pantyliners to you – and there did come a point when I was not sure if I had put one on or not. Because these pads are really soft, light-weight and non-itchy.

These pads do come with a pretty price though, retailing at R69.99 at any Clicks store. But the quality and assurance these babies pack are so worth every rand! If you’re looking for a cheaper alternative, try the ANNA Sanitary Pads or the Clicks MyEarth Organic Cotton Ultra Normal Pads.

Menstrual Disc

Not to be confused with a menstrual cup! The ‘disc’ and ‘cup’ are both inserted into the vagina and collect the menstrual blood rather than absorbing it. Once the disc is inserted, it fits snug behind your pelvic bone in the fornix (space where the vaginal canal meets the cervix) and you’ll know it’s inside correctly because you won’t feel a damn thing! Check out this Healthline article about the science behind the menstrual disc.

L – Menstrual Cup R – Menstrual Disc | Credit: POPSUGAR

Made from squishy and body-safe silicone, these discs make for a cost-effective and environmentally-friendly product. Some, like the Flex Menstrual Disc, are single-use items. But I got my hands on the Softcup Menstrual Disc, which offers 12 hours of period protection and can be reused up to three cycles!

Before I ventured down the disc drive, I trained myself to be comfortable with the idea of inserting something into my vaginal canal. Coming from a Cape Malay, Muslim family – matters of the female anatomy were not always taught with a hint of celebration and acceptance. So if you’re afraid of having a ‘foreign item’ (a tampon, menstrual disc or menstrual cup) being inserted into your vagina, have a look at this helpful article or this one!

The menstrual disc offers you the freedom to run, swim, laugh, sneeze and cough without the feeling of gushing blood. Plus, you can go to bed completely worry-free.

And just you wait until you discover auto-dumping….life-changing!

This product definitely put me in a love-hate relationship with my body. Hate – my fingers coming out full of blood when I removed the disc. Feeling frustrated when I initially need to insert it. Love – learning that the cervix changes position throughout the menstrual cycle. Knowing where my pelvic bone is. Seeing the actual colour and consistency of my blood. Realising that the vagina is not a scary long tunnel, but another little organ that can do amazing things! Some of the other benefits I found when using the menstrual disc, was that it doesn’t cause dryness, nor is there any unpleasant odour.

Just pinch and insert | Credit: Greatist

When you first use this product, add a pantyliner or pad to your underwear in case of spills or leakages. But once you start using it, you kind of choreograph a special dance with your vagina!

Get your very own Softcup Menstrual Disc via the Clicks Online Store or Takealot.com.

Reusable Pads

Also known as cloth pads or washable pads, are made from cloth and absorbent material. This product takes a very traditional approach to managing a period. According to this Hello Clue blog post, if we look at the time of our grandmothers, during the 1800s to 1900s, many would use homemade cloths made of flannel or woven fabrics that they would need to wash after use. Please do yourself the favour and ask the elderly people in your life just how they ‘dealt’ with their periods.

Soft, comfortable and stylish | Credit: SUBZ

Given the harsh ordeals that many humans with vaginas have to face in South Africa alone, many who start menstruating often miss out on school. This is because of a lack of access to conventional menstrual products and an inability to afford them. They make use of homemade pad-like products using old cloth or leaves or newspaper. Some are forced to make use of previously soiled and dried sanitary towels. Enter the rise of the reusable pad! According to this post on The Conversation, reusable pads are easy to adopt as it takes the same habit of needing to be washed after each use, yet boats a safer, more hygienic and kinder period experience.

Speaking of kindness, many local initiatives that make these pads strive to allow menstruating South African humans to attend school even on their period.

I love my comfortable and secure SUBZ reusable pad. It’s made with 6 layers of period protection which includes three layers of hydrophilic (water-loving) fabric, waterproofing layers and hydrophobic (water-repelling) fabric. The outer cotton-knit feels so luxurious against the skin, it instantly adds a sense of comfort when used. Like traditional pads, these come with wings that clip around the gusset of your underwear.

Now the moment you have all been waiting for – yes, you need to wash them after using them. This is something that I know freaks out a lot of people, but honestly, it’s not that bad or big of a deal. I kind of remember watching a video of a woman boasting about the plant-fertilizing properties of period blood and according to this post on the Pixie Cup blog, this has been a growing trend…so, there’s that!?

Rinse the pad under cold running water, this is similar to those pool deep-cleaning videos. It will help to remove the mucus and tissue on the outer layer. Secondly, wash it thoroughly with soapy water. I prefer using good ‘ol Sunlight soap – mild in fragrance and tough on stains. Finally, give it a rinse through clean water, and hang it up to dry. Easy peasy!

My only gripe with the pads is that it lacks something to really make it sit in one place. Throughout the day, I found that my pad would slide around to the back of my panty as I moved. And I don’t think I was actually alone in the aisle while I awkwardly adjusted myself.

These pads are great for people who want to save months’ worth of money on sanitary items, help the environment and protect their bodies from potentially harmful chemicals. Additionally when you purchase a reusable item from the SUBZ website or stockist you instantly support an organisation that actively fights for the freedom of South Africa, where all menstruating individuals can attend school without shame.

The Standard Pad Self Clipping reusable pad costs R27.20, which is roughly the same as an entire pack of pads. Except this one pad will last you between 3 to 5 years! Another brand you can show some love is Palesas Pads. They sell the coveted Flo Kits, which are like those dried fruit gift baskets, except their packed with everything a menstruating person needs in their life! It comes equipped with a pad-designated washing bucket, a variety of reusable pads, hand-washing sops and white spirit vinegar to make sure you really keep your handy-dandy sanitary towels fresh!

BONUS: Relaxing Moves That Help With Period Cramps and Discomfort – these videos are part of my pain-proof-period arsenal. Cassey (Blogilates) and Sarah Beth (SarahBeth Yoga) have these fantastic videos to keep you going.

Easy Weekend Crowd-Pleasers | Recipes For Any Occasion

Set the table, pull out the extra chairs and play that soft house music because these recipes are worth sharing with the ones you love! And if you’re feeling like you need some self-love, the Creamy Curried Pasta recipe is a stunner! Feeling pinched for time, then try the Cheesy Chicken and Corn Wraps! The creator of these tasty creations is the stunning Farzana Kumandan from Sprinkles and Spice, please show her some love!

Cheesy Chicken and Corn Wraps

Ingredients 

2 tablespoons butter

6 chicken fillets cubed

½ cup frozen corn

1 tablespoon Portuguese spice

½ cup water 

¾ cup mayo 

½ cup mild, medium or hot Nandos peri peri sauce (depends on your preference)

Method

Braise the chicken fillets, corn and spice in butter until golden brown

Once browned, add the water and simmer until the chicken has cooked, water has reduced and it’s cooked completely dry

Add in the sauce and mayo

Simmer for 2 minutes until sauce has thickened

Fill your store bought wraps, roll them up and place them packed tightly next to each other in a rectangle Pyrex dish

Generously sprinkle with cheese, and grill on 200 degrees for 5-10 minutes until the cheese bubbles and is grilled to perfection

If you don’t have wraps, roti works well too, make some – its so lekker!

Credit: Farzana Kumandan

Creamy Curried Pasta

Ingredients

500g pasta if your choice

2 tablespoons butter

½ finely diced onion

¼ finely diced red pepper

1 big grated garlic clove

1 punnet sliced mushrooms

3 chicken fillets cut in strips

2x 7g Curry Powder envelopes

½ tsp thyme

1 teaspoons crushed chillies

1 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons sugar

240g tub tomato puree

2x 250ml fresh cream

Method

Boil the pasta in salt water with a dash of olive oil until al dente, strain, rinse in cold water to stop the cooking process and set aside

On a stove top on a medium to high heat, melt the butter

Add the onion, pepper and garlic and braise until light brown

Add the mushrooms and chicken and braise until dry and golden brown

Add the spices, salt, and sugar and mix well

Add the tomato puree and fresh cream bring to boil

Simmer for 5 minutes

Add in the pasta, mix and garnish with coriander

If you making it before hand, heat the sauce and mix in the pasta just before serving, this ensures your pasta is creamy and saucy

Credit: Frazana Kumandan

Show Farzana some love and let her know that we sent you her way!

#COLLAB: Ierse dame (Irish miss)

The poem is written as a metaphor. I have PCOS, which does not allow me to menstruate every month as per normal, so this poem is a semi ode to that. I wrote this poem one night when I was feeling particularly saddened/upset about myself…

All of the poems I’ve written thus far are in Afrikaans, because I feel the language is able to grasp ideas stronger than English could. I have translated it in case there are some who do not understand Afrikaans.

Dis al 8 maande toe ek jou laas sien

– meisie met die rooi hare.


Ek vergéét skoons jou hare

– soos golwe van roos-olie

so glipperig en langdradig


Ek vergeet amper die pyn wat jou gesig

vir my gebring het

– soos ‘n pols van elektrisiteit of

soos ‘n reeksmoordenaar wat

70.

keer.

steek.


Ek sal nooit jou marteling vergeet

soos jy rond my lyf gedans het

of soos jy nóú aan my gedagte sny


Heks met die rooi hare

ek verlang na jou

al sien ek jou nooit weer nie


Dis al 8 maande toe ek jou laas sien.

Saadiqah Schroeder (2019)

Here is the English translation:

It’s been 8 months since I last saw you

– girl with the red hair.


I’ve even forgotten your hair

– like waves of rose-oil

so glistening and tedious


I’ve almost forgotten the pain that your face

brought me

– like a pulse of electricity or

like a serial killer that

stabs.

70.

times.

I will never forget your torturing

as you danced around my body

or how you cut into my thoughts; even now

Witch, with the red hair

– I miss you

even if I never see you again


It’s been 8 months since I last saw you.


Saadiqah Schroeder (2019)

I am a BA student majoring in Linguistics and Afrikaans at UCT. I love the outdoors, nature & animals, art and other thought provoking stimuli. I write poetry, draw & paint as hobbies when I’m not studying.